Every time you talk me about the great Russian Ballet, Composers, Theater, Literature and Art, I will tell you about Russia’s crimes in Ukraine

Every time you talk about the great Russian ballet, I will tell you the story of a young teacher from Brovary who was repeatedly raped in front of her parents and then kidnapped by Russian monsters. About dozens, maybe hundreds of Ukrainian women often raped in front of their children. About 15-16-year-old girls from Borodianka who were subjected to terrible violence by kadyrovites. About the bodies of five raped young girls, killed and left right on the road. About this vile “we will f*ck Ukrainians” in interceptions. Here’s what I’ll tell you in response to the persecuted great Russian ballet.



Every time you tell me about the great Russian composers, I will tell you the story of a girl and her little brother who have been whitnesses of their mother dying for more than one day in Mariupol basement. Then, the children had to continue to hide from the shelling in the basement with the corpse of a dead mother. About a boy from Gostomel, who saw his father being shot by Russian soldiers. Then they wanted to kill a son, but he survived. About a girl who was shot right in the face. About a child who tried to escape with his grandmother in a boat. Grandma drowned and the boy was being looked for for almost a month. Here’s what I’ll tell you in response to the persecuted great Russian composers.

Every time you tell me about the great Russian art, I will tell you about Ukrainian civilians shot in the back in the Makarivskyi district. Before being shot, their hands were tied by orcs. About hundreds of corpses on the streets of Bucha, Irpin, Gostomel. About mass graves in the courtyards of residential areas. Mass graves of civilians who used to live in cities, which were cozy and safe until recently. Mass graves. In the 21st century. That’s what I’ll tell you in response to the persecuted great Russian art.

Every time you tell me about the great Russian theater, I will tell you the story of a woman from Brovarskyi district, whose metal tile was removed from the roof by retreating Russian looters. About tanks and armored personnel carriers of the “second largest army in the world”, filled to the brim with loot from Ukrainian homes. Stolen phones, tablets, TVs, washing machines, carpets, jewelry, bottles of alcohol, frying pans, clothes, toys, shoes – everything that got in the bastards’ way. About how they raced to send the loot to their families in Russia having reached Belarus,. About how they selled stolen goods at Belarusian markets. That’s what I’ll tell you in response to the persecuted great Russian theater. 

Every time you tell me about the great Russian cinema, I will tell you about the horses cruelly shot in the stables of the Kyiv region. About starving and thirsty zoo animals in Yasnogorodka. About deer skin burned after the explosion. And now the absolute barbarism … About the Alabai killed and eaten by the Russian invaders. Yes, Alabay. Yes, dog. Yes, eaten. Here’s what I’ll tell you in response to the persecuted big Russian cinema.

Every time you tell me about great Russian literature, I will tell you about dozens of intercepted conversations between Russian soldiers and their mothers and wives. Conversations in which there is nothing but swear words. Conversations in which wives order what to steal from Ukrainian homes. Conversations when mothers laugh at their sons’ stories about their brothers-in-arms raping Ukrainian women. And if all the swear words are taken out of these conversations, there will only be “hello” and “bye”. That’s what I’ll tell you in response to the persecuted great Russian literature. 

There is no longer great Russian culture, literature, cinema, art, theater and ballet. There is a country of freaks, marauders, rapists and murderers. Wild people who have no place in the civilized world! 

And long-suffering new Russian dissidents in cozy apartments in Berlin, London, Larnaca, Milan, Tbilisi, Astana, Vienna and other temporary shelters, should follow the route of the Russian ship, proudly carrying great Russian culture in their hands! 

Olena Pshenychna

EMPR

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